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Kanstul 1000 Trumpet Review

The Kanstul 1000 Series Bb trumpets made by Kanstul Musical Instruments bears a striking semblance to the Chicago Benge trumpets designed by Elden Benge many years ago.

Features

  • Hand Hammered One Piece Yellow Brass Bell
  • Hand Lapped Pistons
  • Top Spring Pistons
  • 3rd Slide Stop
  • Distinctive Reverse 2nd Slide
  • The Kanstul 1000 is highly rated receiving a 4.9 (out of 5.0) star rating on several retail sites.

Kanstul 1000 vs Kanstul 1001 vs. Kanstul 1070

The Kanstul 1000 series trumpet is available in three bore sizes a 0.460" (Model 1000), 0.464" (Model 1001) and 0.470 (Model 1070).

Charles Hargett of Kanstul describes the difference between the three Kanstul Chicago Trumpets,

"The Model 1001 is a .464 "medium large plus" bore. It offers a slightly larger bore size that you won't fall into, and it stays open as you work your way to the upper register. This horn is the sound of your Tower of Power, Earth Wind & Fire and Tijuana Brass records. The bell thickness is about .020" which gives it a rich core without being too bright. I would characterize it as a "lighter" sound than a Bach, but it's easily colored by the player. The 1001 is perfectly suitable for commercial (rock, pops, big band) and symphonic (Broadway, Community Band, quintet, church work, etc.). I've played this model since before I started at Kanstul and it suits me for all kinds of playing.

The Model 1000 is basically the same horn but with a medium large .460" bore. It's also quite versatile, but the 1001 is the more popular of the two.

The Model 1070 is something like a Besson Meha that Claude Gordon would have liked. It's a large .470" that will fill a hall. It has a lightweight bell that responds quickly and has a bright, lively sound. The 1070 (formerly known as the "Big Band" model) is great for large, loud ensembles like Latin or big band, show band, etc. However, it speaks very well at lower dynamic levels. It is appropriately balanced, but in my opinion is better suited to the strong, full-time player.

The Model 1000 and 1001 are not as bright as the 1070, but I want to say again that these are all easily colored by the player."

Hand Lapped Pistons

One of the signatures of higher end trumpets, including the Kanstul Chicago trumpet, are hand-lapped valve pistons. What this means is that the final fitting of the valves is by a skilled craftsman and not by machine. A fine abrasive compound or slurry is applied between surfaces and the pistons are worked up and down to smooth the surfaces where they meet to ensure a good, leak-free fit.